[personal profile] mjg59
My spare time has been limited lately, so progress on producing Mac-bootable Fedora install images has been a bit slow. Thankfully it looks like everything's gong to land in time for Fedora 17[1] so hurrah for that - all that's missing right now are the last couple of patches that make sure the boot picker displays useful labels on the drives.

So how is this accomplished? Here's a hex dump of the first few K of the image.
00000000  45 52 08 00 00 00 90 90  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |ER..............|
00000010  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000020  33 ed fa 8e d5 bc 00 7c  fb fc 66 31 db 66 31 c9  |3......|..f1.f1.|
00000030  66 53 66 51 06 57 8e dd  8e c5 52 be 00 7c bf 00  |fSfQ.W....R..|..|
00000040  06 b9 00 01 f3 a5 ea 4b  06 00 00 52 b4 41 bb aa  |.......K...R.A..|
00000050  55 31 c9 30 f6 f9 cd 13  72 16 81 fb 55 aa 75 10  |U1.0....r...U.u.|
00000060  83 e1 01 74 0b 66 c7 06  f1 06 b4 42 eb 15 eb 00  |...t.f.....B....|
00000070  5a 51 b4 08 cd 13 83 e1  3f 5b 51 0f b6 c6 40 50  |ZQ......?[Q...@P|
00000080  f7 e1 53 52 50 bb 00 7c  b9 04 00 66 a1 b0 07 e8  |..SRP..|...f....|
00000090  44 00 0f 82 80 00 66 40  80 c7 02 e2 f2 66 81 3e  |D.....f@.....f.>|
000000a0  40 7c fb c0 78 70 75 09  fa bc ec 7b ea 44 7c 00  |@|..xpu....{.D|.|
000000b0  00 e8 83 00 69 73 6f 6c  69 6e 75 78 2e 62 69 6e  |....isolinux.bin|
000000c0  20 6d 69 73 73 69 6e 67  20 6f 72 20 63 6f 72 72  | missing or corr|
000000d0  75 70 74 2e 0d 0a 66 60  66 31 d2 66 03 06 f8 7b  |upt...f`f1.f...{|
000000e0  66 13 16 fc 7b 66 52 66  50 06 53 6a 01 6a 10 89  |f...{fRfP.Sj.j..|
000000f0  e6 66 f7 36 e8 7b c0 e4  06 88 e1 88 c5 92 f6 36  |.f.6.{.........6|
00000100  ee 7b 88 c6 08 e1 41 b8  01 02 8a 16 f2 7b cd 13  |.{....A......{..|
00000110  8d 64 10 66 61 c3 e8 1e  00 4f 70 65 72 61 74 69  |.d.fa....Operati|
00000120  6e 67 20 73 79 73 74 65  6d 20 6c 6f 61 64 20 65  |ng system load e|
00000130  72 72 6f 72 2e 0d 0a 5e  ac b4 0e 8a 3e 62 04 b3  |rror...^....>b..|
00000140  07 cd 10 3c 0a 75 f1 cd  18 f4 eb fd 00 00 00 00  |...<.u..........|
00000150  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
This is the boot sector. One of the fun things about ISO9660 is that it doesn't have a boot sector in the usual x86 sense - firmwares are expected to read enough of the filesystem that they can find the bootloader in it and run it directly. x86 isn't really smart enough to manage that, so it uses something called El Torito[2]. In any case, this is usually empty space on an x86 CD. But with an increasing number of systems shipping without optical drives, real CD installs are decreasing in popularity. We use a piece of software called isohybrid that allows the building of ISO9660 images that can be written directly onto a USB stick. Asking a machine to boot off them will execute the boot sector located here, which then loads a real bootloader that's capable of reading ISO and booting the OS. It'll just be ignored when it's on a real CD.

There's one difference here, though. The isohybrid bootsector has been modified so that the first 32 bytes are just noops, and this has been inserted:
00000000  45 52 08 00 00 00 90 90  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |ER..............|
45 52 ("ER") indicates the presence of an Apple partition map. This will become important later. 0800 indicates that it's using 2048-byte sectors. The 9090 is a lie to convince the firmware that it's not a zero-sized disk without representing dangerous code. We need an Apple partition map because some older Macs won't boot off CD unless the CD has one. But it's sitting right at the start of the boot sector, and this code is going to be executed. Thankfully, the entire Apple header decodes to
00000000  45                inc bp
00000001  52                push dx
00000002  0800              or [bx+si],al
00000004  0000              add [bx+si],al
00000006  90                nop
00000007  90                nop
00000008  0000              add [bx+si],al
0000000A  0000              add [bx+si],al
0000000C  0000              add [bx+si],al
0000000E  0000              add [bx+si],al
00000010  0000              add [bx+si],al
00000012  0000              add [bx+si],al
00000014  0000              add [bx+si],al
00000016  0000              add [bx+si],al
00000018  0000              add [bx+si],al
0000001A  0000              add [bx+si],al
0000001C  0000              add [bx+si],al
0000001E  0000              add [bx+si],al
which is completely harmless - we can execute all these instructions without any interesting changes in state. They'll all be undone by the rest of the boot sector.
000001b0  14 05 00 00 00 00 00 00  4c 1e ed 76 00 00 80 00  |........L..v....|
000001c0  01 00 00 3f a0 89 00 00  00 00 00 50 14 00 00 fe  |...?.......P....|
000001d0  ff ff ef fe ff ff a4 00  00 00 70 04 00 00 00 fe  |..........p.....|
000001e0  ff ff 00 fe ff ff 44 05  00 00 c0 08 00 00 00 00  |......D.........|
000001f0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 55 aa  |..............U.|
This is the MBR partition table. The aim here was to produce media that would boot via BIOS just as well as it does via EFI, and it turns out that there are some systems that refuse to BIOS-boot off GPT media. So we need an MBR partition map. The first entry covers the entire disk and is of type 0. This is important, because some EFI implementations are strict about MBR parsing - if there's an MBR with overlapping partitions, the entire MBR will be ignored. Inconvenient. Fortunately, we've got the source code to this code, and it turns out that partitions of type 0 are ignored when performing this check. So, there's a partition of type 0.

Why does it cover the entire disk? Once we've booted the OS, we need to be able to read the ISO image contained on the USB stick. That means the kernel needs to be able to mount it, which means we need a partition entry that covers the entire disk. Linux is perfectly happy mounting a filesystem from a partition of type 0.

So, the next partition. This is an EFI boot partition that points at the embedded VFAT El-Torito image. Some firmware will decide that we've got an MBR and so will only boot off a partition that exists in it. So, here's an MBR partition to keep them happy.

The final partition covers the embedded HFS+ image. It's there purely for convenience - it means we can access it under Linux in order to update its contents for testing purposes.
00000200  45 46 49 20 50 41 52 54  00 00 01 00 5c 00 00 00  |EFI PART....\...|
00000210  09 27 93 7e 00 00 00 00  01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |.'.~............|
00000220  fe 4f 14 00 00 00 00 00  30 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |.O......0.......|
00000230  de 4f 14 00 00 00 00 00  2a 26 0f 37 23 c9 7f 4f  |.O......*&.7#..O|
00000240  90 df 5e fe 0a 60 1c b0  10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |..^..`..........|
00000250  80 00 00 00 80 00 00 00  ec 70 63 c1 00 00 00 00  |.........pc.....|
00000260  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
And here we have the GPT header. Nothing complicated here, other than it indicates that the first partition descriptor is at LBA 0x10, ie byte 0x2000 - that's further into the disk than normal. That leaves us enough space to fit the Apple partition entries.

Why have a GPT at all? The EFI spec says that machines should boot fine from an MBR partition. Sadly, not all seem to. It also lets us represent the HFS+ partition in a way that makes the Mac firmware happy.
00000800  50 4d 00 00 00 00 00 03  00 00 00 01 00 00 00 10  |PM..............|
00000810  41 70 70 6c 65 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |Apple...........|
00000820  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000830  41 70 70 6c 65 5f 70 61  72 74 69 74 69 6f 6e 5f  |Apple_partition_|
00000840  6d 61 70 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |map.............|
00000850  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0a  00 00 00 03 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000860  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
2K into the disk, here's an Apple partition map. It's 2K into the disk because we set the sector size to 2K in the partition map header. Why did we do that? Because the default is 512 bytes, and if we'd put the partition map at 512 bytes it would have been on top of the GPT header. Why 2K rather than 1K? A couple of reasons. First, the Apple partition map is only used when we boot off an actual CD, and the CD sector size is genuinely 2K. Secondly, because CDs have a sector size of 2K, 2K is a value that's actually been tested in the real world. It's nice to avoid tempting fate.
00001000  50 4d 00 00 00 00 00 03  00 00 00 29 00 00 04 70  |PM.........)...p|
00001010  45 46 49 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |EFI.............|
00001020  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00001030  41 70 70 6c 65 5f 48 46  53 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |Apple_HFS.......|
00001040  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00001050  00 00 00 00 00 00 04 70  00 00 00 33 00 00 00 00  |.......p...3....|
00001060  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
00001800  50 4d 00 00 00 00 00 03  00 00 01 51 00 00 08 c0  |PM.........Q....|
00001810  45 46 49 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |EFI.............|
00001820  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00001830  41 70 70 6c 65 5f 48 46  53 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |Apple_HFS.......|
00001840  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00001850  00 00 00 00 00 00 08 c0  00 00 00 33 00 00 00 00  |...........3....|
00001860  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
The Apple partition map entries. One partition covers the entire disk, the other the embedded HFS+ filesystem. Why do this? Because not all Macs understand EFI El Torito, so won't EFI boot a CD unless there's an Apple partition map. Why have an HFS+ partition at all? Because the same Macs won't boot off FAT.
00002000  a2 a0 d0 eb e5 b9 33 44  87 c0 68 b6 b7 26 99 c7  |......3D..h..&..|
00002010  d0 84 a5 d4 aa 89 e0 40  81 f9 fc e4 04 e9 c2 99  |.......@........|
00002020  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  10 4b 14 00 00 00 00 00  |.........K......|
00002030  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  49 53 4f 48 79 62 72 69  |........ISOHybri|
00002040  64 20 49 53 4f 00 49 53  4f 48 79 62 72 69 64 00  |d ISO.ISOHybrid.|
00002050  41 70 70 6c 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |Appl............|
00002060  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
00002080  a2 a0 d0 eb e5 b9 33 44  87 c0 68 b6 b7 26 99 c7  |......3D..h..&..|
00002090  68 d5 e0 27 72 83 c6 4c  a7 ae 92 dd ed 6c 89 71  |h..'r..L.....l.q|
000020a0  a4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  13 05 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
000020b0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  49 53 4f 48 79 62 72 69  |........ISOHybri|
000020c0  64 00 41 70 70 6c 65 00  41 70 70 6c 00 00 00 00  |d.Apple.Appl....|
000020d0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
00002100  00 53 46 48 00 00 aa 11  aa 11 00 30 65 43 ec ac  |.SFH.......0eC..|
00002110  68 d5 e0 27 72 83 c6 4c  a7 ae 92 dd ed 6c 89 71  |h..'r..L.....l.q|
00002120  44 05 00 00 00 00 00 00  03 0e 00 00 00 00 00 00  |D...............|
00002130  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  49 53 4f 48 79 62 72 69  |........ISOHybri|
00002140  64 00 41 70 70 6c 65 00  41 70 70 6c 00 00 00 00  |d.Apple.Appl....|
00002150  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
Three GPT entries - one covers the entire CD, one covers the embedded FAT filesystem, one covers the embedded EFI filesystem. That ensures that they're all accessible to the firmware.
00008000  01 43 44 30 30 31 01 00  4c 49 4e 55 58 20 20 20  |.CD001..LINUX   |
00008010  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  |                |
00008020  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  46 65 64 6f 72 61 2d 4c  |        Fedora-L|
00008030  69 76 65 43 44 20 20 20  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  |iveCD           |
00008040  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |        ........|
00008050  c4 12 05 00 00 05 12 c4  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00008060  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00008070  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  01 00 00 01 01 00 00 01  |................|
00008080  00 08 08 00 40 00 00 00  00 00 00 40 15 00 00 00  |....@......@....|
00008090  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 17  00 00 00 00 22 00 1d 00  |............"...|
000080a0  00 00 00 00 00 1d 00 08  00 00 00 00 08 00 70 05  |..............p.|
000080b0  01 09 30 36 f0 02 00 00  01 00 00 01 01 00 20 20  |..06..........  |
000080c0  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20  |                |
The ISO9660 superblock. This is completely standard. From here on there's nothing terribly surprising - the CD filesystem itself is entirely normal. The only slight oddity is that we have three embedded El Torito images. The first of these is a BIOS-bootable disk image. That'll be executed whenever the CD is put in a non-EFI machine. The second is a VFAT EFI boot image. That's used for the majority of EFI systems. The third is an HFS+ EFI boot image. There's no strict requirement for the HFS+ one to be an El Torito image - CD booting on Macs is already handled by the Apple partition map. Storing it as an El Torito is purely for convenience, since it guarantees correct alignment and avoids us having to parse the entire ISO9660 image to find its location when generating the partition maps.

In summary: Three partition maps, three bootable images, support for BIOS, UEFI and Mac platforms, works whether it's burned to a CD or written directly to a USB stick. I'm pretty pleased with that.

[1] Other than an awkward bug where something goes horribly wrong during Radeon graphics init, so Radeon-based Macs aren't working too well at the moment. We're working on it.

[2] The world decided that writing a real ISO9660 driver for BIOS was hard, so came up with El Torito. El Torito is a spec for embedding disk images inside ISO9660. There's a pointer to the disk image in the Cd header, so the BIOS simply reads a few blocks off CD, finds that pointer and then sets up a bunch of disk i/o interrupts to point at the embedded filesystem rather than a real disk. From that point on, the El Torito image simply behaves like a floppy or hard drive. This was a reasonable compromise given how resource limited older BIOS implementations were.

For reasons that aren't entirely clear, UEFI doesn't mandate that implementations support ISO9660. So even though our firmware is now sufficiently capable that the only thing standing between it and emacs is someone being sufficiently bored, we still use El Torito. Fortunately the spec allows multiple El Torito images to be embedded, so we can include one that's bootable by BIOS systems and another that's bootable by UEFI systems.

Date: 2012-05-02 02:13 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Do you have a set of scripts that generates this most impressive monstrosity of an image, so that others can use it for their bootable images?

How easily could this approach work for a non-ISO9660 filesystem, such as a USB disk image? I have a bootable disk that needs writability, so ISO9660 won't work.

Do you use separate bootloaders for EFI and non-EFI, or does any means exist to use one bootloader image for both and just boot it two different ways?

Date: 2012-05-02 02:39 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
> This should all be part of isohybrid now, but I have a vague recollection that one of the patches I sent upstream hadn't been merged yet - I'll check that.

Thanks!

> If you need it to be writeable then it's probably not worth most of this complexity, since it's mostly there in order to support booting off CD. Just generate a VFAT filesystem with an EFI bootloader under /EFI/BOOT and use syslinux to make it bootable on BIOS systems.

The Apple partition map and the El Torito image don't matter, sure, but the GPT/MBR hybrid image would still matter, right? Do systems require anything else besides that to reliably boot the same USB disk via either EFI or BIOS?

> Using separate bootloaders is basically a requirement. We're using isolinux for the BIOS side and grub for the EFI side. Long-run, we can probably consolidate on grub2 for all of it.

I had GRUB2 in mind, yes. :) Ideally, though, I'd love to see a single GRUB2 image that knows how to handle booting via either EFI or BIOS, rather than two separate GRUB2 images each with their own separate set of modules (since GRUB2 modules only work with the GRUB2 image they built against, and since the modules curently choose BIOS or EFI at compile time as well).

GRUB2?

Date: 2012-05-08 10:03 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Matthew, why isn't Fedora using GRUB2 yet? Not stable enough or just lack of time? Thanks!

Congrats!

Date: 2012-05-02 03:55 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] id.felipe.lessa.nom.br
Great work! It was a pleasant read as well =).

Re: Congrats!

Date: 2012-05-02 10:15 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
+1! These posts are really interesting. Keep 'em comming!

Loopback ISOs

Date: 2012-05-03 10:35 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Does this work help support booting ISOs that are sitting directly on a key (as described on http://tillmail.de/wordpress/436 )?

I guess https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=650672 will still get in the way though...

Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-05-04 02:23 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Nice post. Tried it out on my Mackbook 2,1 2.16 GHz and received a prompt for Select CD Rom Boot type. It provided two options with blank descriptions and neither were selectable.

Any idea?

Re: Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-05-04 02:30 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Wow quick reply thanks. Makes sense, kind of. :)

Re: Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-05-30 02:28 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
I also have this problem. Is it possible to install Fedora 17 on a Macbook 2.1 any other way?

By creating an image without efi at all maybe?
I had success installing Ubuntu on my macbook. They have done an iso for mac, "ubuntu-12.04-alternate-amd64+mac.iso"

Re: Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-05-31 09:21 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
With the 32bit livecd I was able to get to the grub menu, but then there was black screen, although the system booted up.

So there's problems with the graphics..

When I booted the kernel with nomodeset I got to the commandline, but I can't install the system?

Re: Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-06-08 11:28 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] https://www.google.com/accounts/o8/id?id=AItOawk2C5kmtxNOcfIdzD4TsEwVz-2HoWu_60U
I've had the same trouble (tried EFI boot: no laptop display, tried legacy boot: "Select CD-ROM boot type"), so will have to stick with F15 for the moment.

BZ#765954 (https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=765954) and BZ#826661 (https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=826661) look relevant. If you plug in an external monitor you'll be able to see what you're doing, but that isn't exactly an ideal solution for a laptop…

Re: Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-06-23 02:26 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
I managed to install fedora17 on my macbook2,1 by using dd from the 32bits cd-image to an usb stick (64bits fails to load grub, and burning the 32bit image wasn't working either)

Got to the grub menu then the laptop screen went blank, but the usb stick was still blinking so I plugged in my external monitor and it was working! I was able to install everything fine!

But fedora on my hdd behaves the same way that the usb live image.
after choosing the grub option, the laptop screen goes blank and the external display starts to work.

I can't use the laptop display within fedora it doesn't get detected.
'xrandr -q' shows only VGA and DVI outputs, no LVDS

how can I fix that?

Re: Select CD-ROM Boot Type

Date: 2012-05-04 02:26 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Also to note, it said "Windows" when I held alt to select the CD. Maybe a burning issue or must I use a USB stick for Mac installs ?

Date: 2012-05-04 04:37 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Hi,

i would like to teach this stunt to libisofs, which already does isohybrid
with MBR.

Some questions:

- Where can i download the resulting image for curious inspection ?

- What exactly are the embedded VFAT and HFS+ images ?
Are they files to be put into the ISO filesystem ?
(I assume so because partition 1 starts at 2K block 0 and has 234496 blocks.
Partition 2 starts at 2K block 41 and has 284 blocks.)
How did you get resp. produce them ?

- Which mkisofs options were used to produce the non-hybrid ISO image ?

- What version of SYSLINUX/ISOLINUX did you use for isohybridization ?
Is the harmless code of 32 byte at MBR start a normal feature of
isohybrid, meanwhile ?
What options did you use with program isohybrid ?
Did you have to configure it especially when building ISOLINUX ?

- If you used an own version of isohybrid:
Can you show me the source code of that program ?

- If the MBR code is not from SYSLINUX:
Is there a chance to get it under a license that allows redistribution
under LGPL ?

- Do you know an URL of public specs for Apple partition maps ?

- libisofs offers an own stunt which could be combinable with yours.
It is about having the MBR partitions starting at 32 kB rather than 0:
http://libburnia-project.org/wiki/PartitionOffset
Do you see any obstacles to extend this to your partition descriptions
for Apple and in GPT ?

Thomas

scdbackup@gmx.net (in private)
libburn-hackers@pykix.org (public list)

Date: 2012-05-04 05:39 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Thanks. I will try to grok this all ... and then might be back with more questions.

Thomas

Date: 2012-05-05 11:25 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Do i get it right that the EFI VFAT image may also be booted by non-Macs ?
(What other machines do not work with MBR isohybrid alone ?)

I am working my way through the Apple partitions of Fedora-LiveCD.iso
and perceive inconsistencies about the block size:

- The starting sector of map entry 1 (byte 0x080b) is 1.
So this is given in blocks of 2048.

- The partition size of map entry 1 is 16 (byte 0x080f).
This can hardly be blocks of 2048, because then it would claim the
ISO 9660 superblock as part of the Apple partition map.

- In map entry 2, the starting sector (byte 0x100b) is 41, which matches
the ISO 9660 block address of /isolinux/efiboot.img.
So this must be blocks of 2048.

- In map entry 2, the partition size is 1136 which is 4 times the number
of ISO 9660 blocks of /isolinux/efiboot.img = 284.
So this must be blocks of 512.

Further riddles:

- Map entry 2 points to the block address of /isolinux/efiboot.img but
has as partition type "Apple_HFS". To program "file" it looks like
"FAT (12 bit)".

- The "logical block count" resp. "size of data area" in byte 0x0857 is 10.
Shouldn't it have the same value as "size of partition in sectors" (byte
0x080f) ?
In map entry 2, the two numbers match (both as blocks of 512).

Additionally to your link, i found this URL helpful as reference:
http://opensource.apple.com/source/IOStorageFamily/IOStorageFamily-116/IOApplePartitionScheme.h

Date: 2012-05-05 02:59 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Could you try what happens if you change those size values from 512 byte blocks to 2 KiB blocks ?

I am currently documenting the structure, and it makes an ugly text if i have to point to probable errors about block size.

Date: 2012-05-06 10:56 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
thanks!

Date: 2012-07-06 03:39 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
You are incredible, keep up the good work.

Boot diagram

Date: 2013-12-22 11:54 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
I really could use a boot diagram, because I'm still a bit confused how the isohybrid boot works.

Profile

Matthew Garrett

About Matthew

Power management, mobile and firmware developer on Linux. Security developer at Nebula. Member of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board. Ex-biologist. @mjg59 on Twitter. Content here should not be interpreted as the opinion of my employer.

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