[personal profile] mjg59
It's after Christmas, and some number of people doubtless ended up with Windows 8 PCs and may want to install Linux on them. If you'd like to do that without fiddling with firmware settings, here are your options.
  • Ubuntu 12.10
    The 64-bit version of Ubuntu 12.10 ships with an older version of Shim that's been signed by Microsoft. It should boot out of the box on most systems, but it doesn't have some of the most recent EFI patches that improve compatibility on some machines. Grab it here.
  • Fedora 18
    Fedora 18 isn't quite released yet, but the latest 64-bit test builds include a Microsoft signed copy of the current version of Shim, including the MOK functionality described here. Fedora 18 has some additional EFI support patches that have just been merged into mainline, which should improve compatibility on some machines - especially ones with Radeon graphics. It also has improved support for booting on Macs. You can get it here, but do bear in mind that it's a test release.
  • Sabayon
    According to the wiki, Sabayon now supports UEFI Secure Boot out of the box. I don't know if the current CD images do, though. My understanding is that it's based on the Microsoft signed Shim I discussed here, and you'll have to manually install the key once you've booted the install media. Straightforward enough.
  • Other distributions
    Suse will be using a version of Shim signed by Microsoft, but I don't think it's in any pre-release versions yet. Debian have just merged UEFI support into their installer, but don't have any UEFI Secure Boot support at the moment. I'm not sure what other distributions are planning on doing, but let me know and I'll update the list.
  • The Linux Foundation loader
    The Linux Foundation have still to obtain a signed copy of their bootloader. There's no especially compelling reason to use it - the use case it supports is where you have users who can follow instructions sufficiently to press "y" but not to choose to enrol a key. The most interesting feature it has is the ability to use the MOK database via the usual UEFI LoadImage and StartImage calls, which means bootloaders like gummiboot work. Unfortunately it implements this by hooking into low-level functionality that's not actually required to be present, so relying on this may be somewhat dubious.

About Sabayon

Date: 2012-12-28 03:25 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Hey Matthew, you are correct. We are still ironing out the procedure but it's basically it for now (our daily ISO images now also support booting off USB on UEFI systems): we ship the images with our key + shim-signed. We handle the after-install boot by generating a key at install time and letting (a modified version of) grub handle the signing every time grub-install is spawned. Yes, the user has to enroll the after-install key as well, but that's quite trivial.

Re: About Sabayon

Date: 2012-12-30 01:16 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Having just tried to boot a Sabayonm 64-bit image on a secure boot-enabled system, I must say that if this process is trivial, then I'd like to know what is complicated.

Sam Varghese

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Matthew Garrett

About Matthew

Power management, mobile and firmware developer on Linux. Security developer at Nebula. Member of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board. Ex-biologist. @mjg59 on Twitter. Content here should not be interpreted as the opinion of my employer.

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