[personal profile] mjg59
According to its charter, the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board exists "to advise The Linux Foundation Board of Directors (Board) and the management of The Linux Foundation (Management) on matters related to supporting the technical agenda of The Linux Foundation". It consists of 10 members, with 5 seats up for election each year. Elections take place at an event at Kernel Summit, but are also open to attendees of whichever conference is colocated with the Kernel Summit that year. The election announcement is emailed to the Linux kernel list and tech-board-discuss, a mostly moribund list that springs into life once a year for election announcements.

This arrangement seemed odd to me even back in 2007. Back then the Linux Foundation was already sponsoring development of certain non-kernel components, and now that list is even larger. While nominally open to all, nominations for the TAB tend to end up being people actively involved in the kernel community. That's probably better than people limited to any other single technical community (kernel developers tend to end up dealing with bugs from a fairly wide range of projects, so they're not entirely unaware of what other people have to deal with), but it still seems suboptimal. The current membership is mostly limited to people who spend little to no time working with userspace developers, let alone anyone active in other Linux Foundation projects. I don't think this is a good thing

So, after several years of considering it, I'm finally standing for the TAB. I've been an active developer at most levels of the Linux stack, from the kernel through to desktop environments. I've worked closely with distributions. I've even worked closely with firmware developers. I'm not intimately involved in any of the other Linux Foundation projects, but I have experience that allows me to better understand their needs and motivations than I'd have from having spent my entire life living in the kernel. Being on the TAB would make it easier to ensure that these projects are represented in a meaningful way.

Of the other people who I know are standing (and this list may well grow longer), I'm inclined to vote for:
  • Greg Kroah Hartman - while we've disagreed on a range of points, Greg's worked closely with userspace developers and even represents the Linux Foundation on the UEFI Forum. He's able to provide a wide range of expertise to the TAB and it benefits from that.
  • Jon Corbet - Jon's work on LWN should need no introduction. He's done an amazing job of keeping track of a range of technical developments across the entire Linux community, so is uniquely well suited to making sure that a range of opinions is represented.
  • Sarah Sharp - Sarah's certainly primarily a kernel developer, but she's been the loudest voice calling for the kernel community to spend some time thinking about whether it's as welcoming as it could be. Increasing the diversity of the kernel community allows us to hear a wider range of technical viewpoints, which benefits both the kernel and everything that depends on it.

The election is currently scheduled to be National Museum in Edinburgh on the evening of the 23rd of October. If you're attending Linuxcon or one of the colocated events, please do come along and vote.

(Updated to correct a typo)

Standing for Linux Foundation

Date: 2013-10-17 03:42 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Congratulations. More power to the Linux operating system.

typo

Date: 2013-10-17 04:25 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
minor typo, 'Jon Corbet', not 'Jon Corbert'

Date: 2013-10-17 05:26 pm (UTC)
damerell: (computers)
From: [personal profile] damerell
Good luck, I suspect you'd be OK. :-)

congrats ;-)

Date: 2013-10-30 12:48 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Hey Matthew, glad to see you there, good luck!

--
Michael Shigorin

BIOS malware

Date: 2013-11-25 04:41 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
I'm sorry about the OT comment, but as someone with BIOS and UEFI expertise, would you mind sharing your opinion about the recent reports of the badbios super-malware? It all sounds very implausible to me.

Profile

Matthew Garrett

About Matthew

Power management, mobile and firmware developer on Linux. Security developer at Nebula. Member of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board. Ex-biologist. @mjg59 on Twitter. Content here should not be interpreted as the opinion of my employer.

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