[personal profile] mjg59
The best known smart bulb setups (such as the Philips Hue and the Belkin Wemo) are based on Zigbee, a low-energy, low-bandwidth protocol that operates on various unlicensed radio bands. The problem with Zigbee is that basically no home routers or mobile devices have a Zigbee radio, so to communicate with them you need an additional device (usually called a hub or bridge) that can speak Zigbee and also hook up to your existing home network. Requests are sent to the hub (either directly if you're on the same network, or via some external control server if you're on a different network) and it sends appropriate Zigbee commands to the bulbs.

But requiring an additional device adds some expense. People have attempted to solve this in a couple of ways. The first is building direct network connectivity into the bulbs, in the form of adding an 802.11 controller. Go through some sort of setup process[1], the bulb joins your network and you can communicate with it happily. Unfortunately adding wifi costs more than adding Zigbee, both in terms of money and power - wifi bulbs consume noticeably more power when "off" than Zigbee ones.

There's a middle ground. There's a large number of bulbs available from Amazon advertising themselves as Bluetooth, which is true but slightly misleading. They're actually implementing Bluetooth Low Energy, which is part of the Bluetooth 4.0 spec. Implementing this requires both OS and hardware support, so older systems are unable to communicate. Android 4.3 devices tend to have all the necessary features, and modern desktop Linux is also fine as long as you have a Bluetooth 4.0 controller.

Bluetooth is intended as a low power communications protocol. Bluetooth Low Energy (or BLE) is even lower than that, running in a similar power range to Zigbee. Most semi-modern phones can speak it, so it seems like a pretty good choice. Obviously you lose the ability to access the device remotely, but given the track record on this sort of thing that's arguably a benefit. There's a couple of other downsides - the range is worse than Zigbee (but probably still acceptable for any reasonably sized house or apartment), and only one device can be connected to a given BLE server at any one time. That means that if you have the control app open while you're near a bulb, nobody else can control that bulb until you disconnect.

The quality of the bulbs varies a great deal. Some of them are pure RGB bulbs and incapable of producing a convincing white at a reasonable intensity[2]. Some have additional white LEDs but don't support running them at the same time as the colour LEDs, so you have the choice between colour or a fixed (and usually more intense) white. Some allow running the white LEDs at the same time as the RGB ones, which means you can vary the colour temperature of the "white" output.

But while the quality of the bulbs varies, the quality of the apps doesn't really. They're typically all dreadful, competing on features like changing bulb colour in time to music rather than on providing a pleasant user experience. And the whole "Only one person can control the lights at a time" thing doesn't really work so well if you actually live with anyone else. I was dissatisfied.

I'd met Mike Ryan at Kiwicon a couple of years back after watching him demonstrate hacking a BLE skateboard. He offered a couple of good hints for reverse engineering these devices, the first being that Android already does almost everything you need. Hidden in the developer settings is an option marked "Enable Bluetooth HCI snoop log". Turn that on and all Bluetooth traffic (including BLE) is dumped into /sdcard/btsnoop_hci.log. Turn that on, start the app, make some changes, retrieve the file and check it out using Wireshark. Easy.

Conveniently, BLE is very straightforward when it comes to network protocol. The only thing you have is GATT, the Generic Attribute Protocol. Using this you can read and write multiple characteristics. Each packet is limited to a maximum of 20 bytes. Most implementations use a single characteristic for light control, so it's then just a matter of staring at the dumped packets until something jumps out at you. A pretty typical implementation is something like:

0x56,r,g,b,0x00,0xf0,0x00,0xaa

where r, g and b are each just a single byte representing the corresponding red, green or blue intensity. 0x56 presumably indicates a "Set the light to these values" command, 0xaa indicates end of command and 0xf0 indicates that it's a request to set the colour LEDs. Sending 0x0f instead results in the previous byte (0x00 in this example) being interpreted as the intensity of the white LEDs. Unfortunately the bulb I tested that speaks this protocol didn't allow you to drive the white LEDs at the same time as anything else - setting the selection byte to 0xff didn't result in both sets of intensities being interpreted at once. Boo.

You can test this out fairly easily using the gatttool app. Run hcitool lescan to look for the device (remember that it won't show up if anything else is connected to it at the time), then do gatttool -b deviceid -I to get an interactive shell. Type connect to initiate a connection, and once connected send commands by doing char-write-cmd handle value using the handle obtained from your hci dump.

I did this successfully for various bulbs, but annoyingly hit a problem with one from Tikteck. The leading byte of each packet was clearly a counter, but the rest of the packet appeared to be garbage. For reasons best known to themselves, they've implemented application-level encryption on top of BLE. This was a shame, because they were easily the best of the bulbs I'd used - the white LEDs work in conjunction with the colour ones once you're sufficiently close to white, giving you good intensity and letting you modify the colour temperature. That gave me incentive, but figuring out the protocol took quite some time. Earlier this week, I finally cracked it. I've put a Python implementation on Github. The idea is to tie it into Ulfire running on a central machine with a Bluetooth controller, making it possible for me to control the lights from multiple different apps simultaneously and also integrating with my Echo.

I'd write something about the encryption, but I honestly don't know. Large parts of this make no sense to me whatsoever. I haven't even had any gin in the past two weeks. If anybody can explain how anything that's being done there makes any sense at all[3] that would be appreciated.

[1] typically via the bulb pretending to be an access point, but also these days through a terrifying hack involving spewing UDP multicast packets of varying lengths in order to broadcast the password to associated but unauthenticated devices and good god the future is terrifying

[2] For a given power input, blue LEDs produce more light than other colours. To get white with RGB LEDs you either need to have more red and green LEDs than blue ones (which costs more), or you need to reduce the intensity of the blue ones (which means your headline intensity is lower). Neither is appealing, so most of these bulbs will just give you a blue "white" if you ask for full red, green and blue

[3] Especially the bit where we calculate something from the username and password and then encrypt that using some random numbers as the key, then send 50% of the random numbers and 50% of the encrypted output to the device, because I can't even

State querying

Date: 2016-07-08 08:18 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Isn't the advantage of Xbee based solutions that you can query the state of the bulb? Is that possible with the bluetooth ?

Re: State querying

Date: 2016-07-11 08:08 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Does the Tikteck bulb implement this?

It almost doesn't matter since only one device can be paired with it, so the software on that device can really be the one to care.

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Matthew Garrett

About Matthew

Power management, mobile and firmware developer on Linux. Security developer at Google. Ex-biologist. @mjg59 on Twitter. Content here should not be interpreted as the opinion of my employer.

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