I was really hoping for faint relief

Jun. 24th, 2016 06:25 am
rmc28: Charles facepalming eloquently (facepalm)
[personal profile] rmc28
At least I managed to sleep.

And now on with the daily routine, because work, school and nursery haven't stopped.

Election day.

Jun. 23rd, 2016 08:04 pm
rmc28: Photo of me shortly before starting my first half-marathon (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
I did absolutely nothing for the local elections last month, apart from go and vote. 

A couple of weeks ago I decided to volunteer a very limited amount of time for today's referendum (for my local LibDems, who are campaigning for Remain) and took the day off work, as part of my ongoing "burn leave to keep effectively working part-time" plan.  So I have done two shifts of telling today: the first was in muggy but dry weather; the second was in pouring rain, including a very nearby lightning strike at which I screamed rather embarrassingly.

I am now back in bed and would rather like to sleep from now until the result is clear tomorrow.  At best tomorrow I will feel a faint sense of relief rather than anything actually positive about the whole exercise, and at worst I will feel extremely worried and miserable.  (And then I'll pick myself up and carry on because I still have Stuff To Get Done no matter what happens.)


Today's bird: Coot



Good things this week

Jun. 19th, 2016 10:18 pm
rmc28: Photo of me shortly before starting my first half-marathon (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
I went to a short meeting at school to confirm arrangements for Nicholas's start in September.  They are being more flexible than when Charles started: for the first ten days of term, they are offering half-day drop-ins for the new starters, but leaving it up to parents which days and how many sessions to sign up for, suggesting a minimum of two.  Then they are starting the children full time, in three waves.  Nicholas is in the last wave, presumably because he's among the youngest.  So we are able to start sorting out logistics, what days off we will need, giving notice at nursery, and so on.

Charles's class ran an assembly for the rest of the school, showing what they've been working on.  One of those things was filming and editing montages of themselves doing sports, and Charles's montage was one of the ones selected to be shown.  I was terribly proud :-)

Tony and I began our couples counselling with Maggie's Wallace, which seemed to get off to a good start.

I went out and socialised last night with lovely people.

Although I was very tired this morning, I have managed to be sensible and pace myself and get essential things done but not exhaust myself.



Bird of the day: Lesser White-Fronted Goose

Chapter 34: General Woundwort

Jun. 19th, 2016 06:14 pm
rmc28: Photo of cover of Penguin edition of Watership Down, by Richard Adams (watership)
[personal profile] rmc28
Dusk was falling on Efrafa.


[This post is part of my Watership Down read through. You are welcome to join in at any time; please read my introduction post first.]

Security Through Obscurity

Jun. 17th, 2016 05:33 pm
brainwane: The last page of the zine (zine)
[personal profile] brainwane
I was at a conference, talking with some men, on our way to an informal group dinner. We started talking about what we were reading. One of them (white, US American) and I started talking about comics; we both like comics. I said something enthusiastic about Saga.

He then stated a disclaimer: that he knew he was a bit of a snob, and that if someone asked him if he knew about/read something fairly popular, fairly mainstream, he sort of internally sighed a bit; he preferred pretty offbeat stuff. It seemed like he wanted to prevent bad feelings down the line by forestalling me from asking "have you read [superhero thing]" or "have you read [current critics' darling]" and triggering impatience. I asked if I'd just done that thing, by mentioning Saga, and he said, no, it was fine.

I asked: "So, what's your favorite Amar Chitra Katha?"

There were at least a few seconds of silence, solid eye contact and silence, before he said that he did not know what that was.

So I, pleasantly, told him about the comics I'd read in childhood, made by Indians for many decades, featuring Indian fables, mythology, history, and legends. We then talked about, for instance, Greek and Norse mythology in Marvel/DC mainstream comics, and so on. He mentioned that it did seem like new Indian comics lines were starting up. He did not ask how or where to get ACK comics, or how to spell Amar Chitra Katha so he could learn more.

He didn't say anything explicitly acknowledging my indier-than-thou move (and I didn't either). I wonder whether he noticed it. I will usually prefer enthusiasm over status play, but I do have a few dominance displays in my toolbox and on occasion I will use them.

Armour comes in many forms

Jun. 17th, 2016 12:20 am
rmc28: Photo of me shortly before starting my first half-marathon (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
Well, this has been a horrible week. The mass murder of LGBT+ people in Orlando, some unpleasantness at work, and now the murder of Jo Cox.  I'm not talking about the work stuff in public, and really it's not on the same scale, but I am tired and sad and angry with the combination of it all.  And also bloody-minded and determined to work to make things better, to plant myself by the river of truth and say "No, you move", but it's a grim exhausted kind of determination.

And just as I finished writing this, Tony came home with my Unsubtle Rainbow Jewellery as made by [personal profile] ceb and won by me in the Con or Bust auction, and I feel a tiny bit better.



Reading! Onna Wednesday!

Jun. 15th, 2016 10:56 pm
rmc28: Photo of me shortly before starting my first half-marathon (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
I have been too tired and too busy to read much for weeks and weeks, but I did start getting back into the reading habit shortly before going on holiday.

What I've read: short fiction

Lullaby for a Lost World by Aliette de Bodard
A rather dark and potentially depressing story, but beautifully told.

Three stories by Charlotte Ashley who I discovered through the Campbell Award nominees collection organised ahead of Hugo nominations:
Sigrid Under the Mountain
Eleusinian Mysteries
The Will of Parliament

Also, way back when, I got through the rest of the serialised story, The Witch Who Came In From The Cold, and liked it very much but felt the end-of-season was a bit weak. Classic leaving things open for the next season kind of weakness that one gets in TV series.

What I've read: long fiction
  • Dragon’s Luck by Lauren Esker : lovely, charming addition to the Shifter Agents series, not reliant on reading previous books, great review by[personal profile] rachelmanija to which I don't feel I can add
  • The Beta’s Test by Dessa Lux: enjoyable addition to the gay werewolves in California series
  • House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard: I eventually got to the end of this; it was very beautifully written and had a great concept of magic and its sources, but the story and background were utterly depressing
  • Saving the CEO by Jenny Holiday: a fairly standard pleasant straight romance
  • Magic and Manners by C.E. Murphy: a delightful rewrite of Pride and Prejudice with magic; the plot is similar but diverges in appropriate ways given the presence of magic (and fixed up a couple of my biggest annoyances with the source story).  I loved this very much.
  • Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho: very enjoyable Regency magic story with non-white protagonists, matter-of-fact description of the resulting racism and inclusivity issues, plus forceful auntie figures and a lot of humour.  This review by [personal profile] skygiants covers the key points for me.

What I'm reading now
I'm kind of stuck on The Oncoming Storm by Christopher G Nuttall which is an okay-ish MilSF book I picked up for cheap as first in a series. It's very very heteronormative and predictable, but page-turny when I'm actually reading it. I suspect I might be happier leaving it unfinished and rereading something with more lesbians in.


Milestone: worked a full week

Jun. 12th, 2016 04:52 pm
rmc28: Photo of me shortly before starting my first half-marathon (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
This is the first time I have done such a thing since I got ill last summer.

I had three days of training (in Cambridge city centre, so pretty convenient) and then two in the office.  I am not actually meeting my criteria for trying to work full-time yet: my study hours are still less than they should be and my Regularly dashboard is still mostly in the red, but I failed to organise taking a day off in good time, and decided to treat it as a learning experience.

I learned that it was survivable but pretty exhausting. I must make sure I book a day off next week.  I also decided to drop T'ai Chi for the rest of the term as I have made it to half the classes so far, but too often by Friday lunchtime I am just too tired, and it's one less thing to worry about.

I have at least been keeping up my daily Duolingo habit much better in the last two weeks.  I decided to add Swedish, because while a Finnish course does not (yet?) exist on Duolingo, Swedish is an official language in Finland, so I will at least know something when we go there next year.  I also discovered a Welsh course has been added sometime in the last few months so I failed to resist adding that too.

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Matthew Garrett

About Matthew

Power management, mobile and firmware developer on Linux. Security developer at CoreOS. Member of the Free Software Foundation board of directors. Ex-biologist. @mjg59 on Twitter. Content here should not be interpreted as the opinion of my employer.

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